Archive for the ‘Day 2 Day’ Category


 I hurried into the local department store to grab some last minute Christmas gifts. I looked at all the people and grumbled to myself. I would be in here forever and I just had so much to do. Christmas was beginning to become such a drag. I kind of wished that I could just sleep through Christmas but I hurried the best I could through all the people to the toy department.Once again I kind of mumbled to myself at the prices of all these toys and wondered if the grandkids would even play with them. I found myself in the doll aisle. Out of the corner of my eye I saw a little boy about age 5 holding a lovely doll. He kept touching her hair and he held her so gently. I could not seem to help myself.

I just kept looking over at the little boy and wondered whom the doll was for. I watched him turn to a woman and he called his aunt by name said,

“Are you sure I don’t have enough money?”

She replied a bit impatiently, “You know that you don’t have enough money for it.”

The aunt told the little boy not to go anywhere, that she had to go get some other things and would be back in a few minutes and then she left the aisle. The boy continued to hold the doll.

After a bit I asked the boy whom the doll was for. He said,

“It is the doll my sister wanted so badly for Christmas. She just knew that Santa would bring it.”

I told him that maybe Santa was going to bring it.

He said “No, Santa can’t go where my sister is…I have to give the doll to my Mamma to take to her.”

I asked him where his sister was. He looked at me with the saddest eyes and said,

“She has gone to be with Jesus. My Daddy says that Mama is going to have to go be with her.”

My heart nearly stopped beating. Then the boy looked at me again and said,

“I told my Daddy to tell Mama not to go yet. I told him to tell her to wait till I got back from the store.”

Then he asked me if I wanted to see his picture. I told him I would love to. He pulled out some pictures he’d had taken at the front of the store. He said,

“I want my Mamma to take this with her so she don’t ever forget me. I love my Mama so very much and I wish she did not have to leave me. But Daddy says she will need to be with my sister.”

I saw that the little boy had lowered his head and had grown so very quiet.

While he was not looking I reached into my purse and pulled out a handful of bills. I asked the little boy,

“Shall we count that money one more time?”

He grew excited and said, “Yes, I just know it has to be enough.”

So I slipped my money in with his and we began to count it. Of course it was plenty for the doll. He softly said,

“Thank you Jesus for giving me enough money.”

Then the boy said, “I just asked Jesus to give me enough money to buy this doll so Mama can take it with her to give to my sister. And he heard my prayer. I wanted to ask him for enough to buy my Mama a white rose, but I didn’t ask him, but he gave me enough to buy the doll and a rose for my Mama. She loves white roses so very, very much.”

In a few minutes the aunt came back and I wheeled my cart away. I could not keep from thinking about the little boy as I finished my shopping in a totally different spirit than when I had started.

I kept remembering a story I had seen in the newspaper several days earlier about a drunk driver hitting a car and killing a little girl and the mother was in serious condition. The family was deciding on whether to remove the life support. Now surely this little boy did not belong with that story.

Two days later I read in the paper where the family had disconnected the life support and the young woman had died. I could not forget the little boy and just kept wondering if the two were somehow connected.

Later that day, I could not help myself and I went out and bought some white roses and took them to the funeral home where the young woman was. And there she was holding a lovely white rose, the beautiful doll, and the picture of the little boy in the store.

I left there in tears, my life changed forever. The love that little boy had for his little sister and his mother was overwhelming. In a split second a drunk driver had ripped the life of that little boy to pieces.

 
 A true story I read.

A marble a weekend

Posted: August 19, 2013 in Day 2 Day

Nice Narration

The older I get, the more I enjoy Saturday mornings. Perhaps it’s the quiet solitude that comes with being the first to rise, of maybe it’s the unbounded joy of not having to be at work. Either way, the first few hours of a Saturday morning are most enjoyable.

A few weeks ago, I was shuffling toward the kitchen, with a steaming cup of coffee in one hand and the morning paper in the other. What began as a typical Saturday morning turned into one of those lessons that life seems
to hand you from time to time.

Let me tell you about it. I turned the volume up on my radio in order to listen to a Saturday morning talk show. I heard an older sounding chap with a golden voice. You know the kind, he sounded like he should be in the
broadcasting business himself.

He was talking about “a thousand marbles” to someone named “Tom”. I was intrigued and sat down to listen to what he had to say. “Well, Tom, it sure sounds like you’re busy with your job. I’m sure they pay you well but it’s a shame you have to be away from home and your family so much. Hard to believe a young fellow should have to work sixty or seventy hours a week to make ends meet. Too bad you missed your daughter’s dance recital. ” He continued, “Let me tell you something Tom, something that has helped me keep a good perspective on my own priorities.” And that’s when he began to explain his theory of a “thousand marbles.”

“You see, I sat down one day and did a little arithmetic. The average person lives about seventy-five years. I know, some live more and some live less, but on average, folks live about seventy-five years.” “Now then, I multiplied 75
times 52 and I came up with 3900 which is the number of Saturdays that the average person has in their entire lifetime.

“Now stick with me Tom, I’m getting to the important part. “It took me until I was fifty-five years old to think about all this in any detail”, he went on, “and by that time I had lived through over twenty-eight hundred Saturdays. “I got to thinking that if I lived to be seventy-five, I only had about a thousand of them left to enjoy. “So I went to a toy store and bought every single marble they had. I ended up having to visit three toy stores to round-up 1000 marbles. “I took them home and put them inside of a large, clear plastic container right here in my workshop next to the radio. Every Saturday since then, I have taken one marble out and thrown it away.

“I found that by watching the marbles diminish, I focused more on the really important things in life. There is nothing like watching your time here on this earth run out to help get your priorities straight. “Now let me tell you one last thing before I sign-off with you and take my lovely wife out for breakfast. This morning, I took the very last marble out of the container. I figure if I make it until next Saturday then God has blessed me with a little extra time to be with my loved ones…… “It was nice to talk to you Tom, I hope you spend more time with your loved ones, and I hope to meet you again someday. Have a good morning!”

You could have heard a pin drop when he finished. Even the show’s moderator didn’t have anything to say for a few moments. I guess he gave us all a lot to think about. I had planned to do some work that morning, then go to the
gym. Instead, I went upstairs and woke my wife up with a kiss. “C’mon honey, I’m taking you and the kids to breakfast.” “What brought this on?” she asked with a smile. “Oh, nothing special,” I said. ” It has just been a
long time since we spent a Saturday together with the kids. Hey, can we stop at a toy store while we’re out? I need to buy some marbles.”

A Blind Boy!!!

Posted: June 21, 2013 in Awesome 2 Read, Day 2 Day

A blind boy sat on the steps of a building with a hat by his feet. He held up a sign which said: “I am blind, please help.”

There were only a few coins in the hat.

A man was walking by. He took a few coins from his pocket and dropped them into the hat. He then took the sign, turned it around, and wrote some words. He put the sign back so that everyone who walked by would see the new words.

Soon the hat began to fill up. A lot more people were giving money to the blind boy. That afternoon the man who had changed the sign came to see how things were.

The boy recognized his footsteps and asked, “Were you the one who changed my sign this morning? What did you write?”

The man said, “I only wrote the truth. I said what you said but in a different way.”

What he had written was: “Today is a beautiful day and I cannot see it.”

Do you think the first sign and the second sign were saying the same thing?

Of course both signs told people the boy was blind. But the first sign simply said the boy was blind. The second sign told people they were so lucky that they were not blind. Should we be surprised that the second sign was more effective?

Moral of the story: Be thankful for what you have. Be creative. Be innovative. Think differently and positively.

Invite others towards good with wisdom. Live life with no excuse and love with no regrets. When life gives you a 100 reasons to cry, show life that you have 1000 reasons to smile. Face your past without regret. Handle your present with confidence. Prepare for the future without fear. Keep the faith and drop the fear.

Great men say, “Life has to be an incessant process of repair and reconstruction, of discarding evil and developing goodness…. In the journey of life, if you want to travel without fear, you must have the ticket of a good conscience.”

The most beautiful thing is to see a person smiling… And even more beautiful is, knowing that you are the reason behind it!!!


A sobbing little girl stood near a small church from which
she had been turned away because it was “too crowded.”
“I can’t go to Sunday School,” she sobbed to the pastor as he
walked by.

Seeing her shabby, unkempt appearance, the pastor
guessed the reason and,taking her by the hand, took her inside and
found a place for her in the Sunday school class. The child was so
happy that they found room for her, and she went to bed that night
thinking of the children who have no place to worship Jesus.

Some two years later, this child lay dead in one of the poor tenement
buildings. Her parents called for the kind-hearted pastor who had
befriended their daughter to handle the final arrangements.

As her poor little body was being moved, a worn and crumpled red purse
was found which seemed to have been rummaged from some trash dump.

Inside was found 57 cents and a note, scribbled in childish
handwriting , which read: “This is to help build the little
church bigger so more children can go to Sunday School.”

For two years she had saved for this offering of love.

When the pastor tearfully read that note, he knew instantly what he would do.
Carrying this note and the cracked, red pocketbook to the pulpit, he
told the story of her unselfish love and devotion.

He challenged his deacons to get busy and raise enough money for the
larger building.

But the story does not end there…

A newspaper learned of the story and published it. It was read by a
wealthy realtor who offered them a parcel of land worth many
thousands.

When told that the church could not pay so much,
he offered to sell it to the little church for 57 cents.

Church members made large donations. Checks came from far and wide. Within
five years the little girl’s gift had increased to $250,000.00–a
huge sum for that time (near the turn of the century). Her unselfish
love had paid large dividends.

When you are in the city of Philadelphia, look up TempleBaptistChurch, with a seating capacity of
3,300. And be sure to visit TempleUniversity, where thousands of students are educated.

Have a look, too, at the Good Samaritan Hospital and at a Sunday School building which houses
hundreds of beautiful children, built so that no child in the area will ever need to be left outside during Sunday school time.

In one of the rooms of this building may be seen the picture of the
sweet face of the little girl whose 57 cents, so sacrificially saved,
made such remarkable history. Alongside of it is a portrait of her
kind pastor, Dr. Russel H. Conwell, author of the book, “Acres
of Diamonds”

This is a true story, which goes to show what god can do with 57 cents.  

The Mouse Trap !!!

Posted: May 31, 2013 in Day 2 Day

 

A mouse looked through the crack in the wall to see the farmer and his wife open a package. “What food might this contain?” the mouse wondered. He was devastated to discover it was a mousetrap.

Retreating to the farmyard, the mouse proclaimed the warning: “There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!”

The chicken clucked and scratched, raised her head and said, “Mr. Mouse, I can tell this is a grave concern to you, but it is of no consequence to me. I cannot be bothered by it.”

The mouse turned to the pig and told him, “There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!” The pig sympathized, but said, “I am so very sorry, Mr. Mouse, but there is nothing I can do about it but pray. Be assured you are in my prayers.”

The mouse turned to the cow and said, “There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!” The cow said, “Wow, Mr. Mouse. I’m sorry for you, but it’s no skin off my nose.”

So, the mouse returned to the house, head down and dejected, to face the farmer’s mousetrap alone.

That very night a sound was heard throughout the house – like the sound of a mousetrap catching its prey. The farmer’s wife rushed to see what was caught. In the darkness, she did not see it was a venomous snake whose tail the trap had caught. The snake bit the farmer’s wife. The farmer rushed her to the hospital and she returned home with a fever.

Everyone knows you treat a fever with fresh chicken soup, so the farmer took his hatchet to the farmyard for the soup’s main ingredient. But his wife’s sickness continued, so friends and neighbors came to sit with her around the clock. To feed them, the farmer butchered the pig. The farmer’s wife did not get well; she died. So many people came for her funeral, the farmer had the cow slaughtered to provide enough meat for all of them.

The mouse looked upon it all from his crack in the wall with great sadness. So, the next time you hear someone is facing a problem and think it doesn’t concern you, remember, when one of us is threatened, we are all at risk. We are all involved in this journey called life. We must keep an eye out for one another and make an extra effort to encourage one another. Each of us is a vital thread in another person’s tapestry.

Winning Combination

Posted: May 22, 2013 in Day 2 Day

Prologue:

‘Alexander and Bucephalus’ signifies a success combination. They signify a twin concept inseparable from each other like two sides of a coin. Success reigned till this combination survived together and King Alexander was awarded the title of ‘Alexander the Great’, the military genius who never lost a battle. But how this became possible?

Expansion:

In the city state of Macedon, during the reign of Philip, a wild horse was the focus of attention for a huge crowd gathered around it including the King himself and his little boy. Many a men lay with fractured legs and hands around the horse. They all have obviously made attempts to tame the horse and failed. Then the King’s little boy came forward and asked the King, ‘Father, shall I try once?’. At first the King was reluctant in granting permission and finally gave up at the boy’s persistance and allowed him the permission to attempt.

The boy walked near the horse, curiously observing it. As he kept observing, he knew this was his partner in game to carry him towards his great destiny. The anxiety of the people around reached its climax as they were much worried about the well being of their prince.The boy circled round the horse without taking his focus from it. The horse seemed to remain silent as if he has found his owner of a past life. Suddenly the curtain lifted and puzzle got resolved, as the boy found the horse fearing its own shade while it faced the sun. He slowly turned the horse away from the sun, uttering words of affection into its ears. The people around lost patience and wondered what their prince was upto? Once the horse got fully turned away from the sun, the boy in one leap got on the horse’s back and started riding it to the great amazement and cheer of all around them. This ride didn’t stop till the Prince Alexander became the king of Macedon and conquered the known world at the age of 25 when his beloved horse fell in the battle earning the last success for its beloved King.

Whenever we think of King Alexander, we cannot avoid the thought of his beloved and brave horse Bucephalus. This is the relationship between a leader and his team. A Great team is a like a wild horse not accepting any one as its leader so easily without testing them. A Great leader is one who knows how to tame this wild horse through affection and find ways to allay their fears and doubts and ride together with it to a Great destiny for both of them which will be remembered by posterity.

 


With lifestyle diseases so rampant today, shouldn’t we turn our attention to clean and safe eating practices, asks Geeta Padmanabhan

(Hindu Article)

Watch carefully what you eat, said Anantha Sayanam, coordinator, Safe Food Alliance and founder-volunteer, Restore — a not-for-profit organic retail outlet. That’s “clean eating”, right? Call it “safe eating”, he corrected me. But “clean eating” is the current buzzword — routinely tagged to tweets, found in blogs, posted on Instagram and Facebook, and seen on television screens. Is it a diet? A trendy lifestyle? A passing fancy?

Clean food is a simple concept; it’s what eating was always about, said Dr. David Katz, Director, Yale University Prevention Research Centre. “Food that’s clean is food that’s for the most part real, not encumbered with things that compromise health: artificial flavourings, artificial colourings, sugar substitutes.”

Eat locally-grown, organic food, says clean eating pioneer, chef Ric Orlando in his book We Want Clean Food. This food doesn’t need long commutes, so is less cruel on the environment. Look for natural chicken, sustainable seafood, grass-fed cow’s milk. Fry food with non-genetically modified oils.

Ingredient awareness

Clean eating is also seen as ingredient awareness. It is the antidote to the argument that population is increasing, land for growing food is shrinking; therefore walk into labs to “create” food, or “augment” food that is average in nutrients. So you have cornflakes with calcium, biscuits with protein, beverages with vitamins A-Z, bread with probiotics. We get packaged food with a list of ingredients we have no clue about. Books such as Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma, the documentary Food, Inc. and the wide coverage given to Michelle Obama’s healthy eating campaign (grow your own food, buy food at the local farmers’ markets) have tried to check this trend.

You can’t deny clean eating equals good health. Heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes have all been traced to what goes into what we eat. Ivy Larson, co-author of Clean Cuisine claims her multiple sclerosis symptoms were lessened when she went on a clean diet of whole foods and no packaged items. Start with one “clean” meal a day, she writes. Stock fruits and vegetables — even frozen ones — for a quick and safe meal. Buy food that has the shortest “ingredients” list.

Not a new thought

“Safe eating is a lifestyle, rather lifestyle correction,” is Ananthoo’s explanation. New age, non-communicable diseases are called lifestyle diseases (NCD). Safe eating is correcting one’s alienation and understanding of food and food habits. It is getting close to the production, processing and consumption of food. When you do that, you automatically set right your diet. Not a new thought at all, he points out. Full-length epic books were written about safe eating 3000 years ago. Ashtanga Hrudaya by Vaag Bhatt was one. Ayurveda has dincharyam, ritucharyam and diets for various ailments. Treatment and medication through food was tried by our civilisation long ago.

For forty-five minutes this self-health promoter shocked the audience at a Residents’ Association meet with details of what goes into the processed foods we buy, what is done to keep imported fruits fresh, how fruit/vegetable growers poison their produce to increase shelf life. “I once distributed magnifying glasses,” he said, “and asked the audience to read the ingredients list on packaged food. I try to bring a quick insight into food, diet habits and how industrialisation of food is spinning out of control.” Safe food is a win-win proposition, he said. “Your insistence on healthy nutritious food results in best production practices and better livelihoods for farmers.”

Eat traditional food, go organic, do what you can to consume safe food, was Anantha’s mantra to the crowd. High residues of toxic chemicals in fertilizers and pesticides are left over in the produce. More harm is added through additives, carcinogenic colours and un-named preservatives. “Both sugar and jaggery come from the same cane, but the process makes one harmful, the other safe.”

At the end of the meet, a complete meal of millet dishes — Saamai Kootanchoru, Thinai sweet (jaggery) pongal, Varagu sambar rice, Samai curd rice, Keerai masiyal and paanagam — was served by Nalla Keerai volunteers. Yummy!

DOS AND DON’TS

– Buy pesticide-free organic food in your locality.

– Understand the ingredients; reject food with ingredients you don’t understand.

– Avoid pre-processed/canned/frozen foods.

– Avoid refined products such as maida, sugar, refined oils/rice.

– Consume whole grains. Always opt for plant-based, low-fat food.

– Opt for traditional varieties of rice, eat them unpolished.

– Include millets (foxtail, kodo, barnyard, ragi) for balanced nutrition.

– Avoid all soft drinks. Go for fresh fruit juices and tender coconut water instead.

– Most toothpastes have nicotine and even SLS — a proven carcinogen. Move to herbal tooth powders and non-foaming pastes.

– Imported food stuff has genetically modified ingredients. Watch out!