Architects of our life

Posted: July 4, 2013 in Awesome 2 Read

An elderly carpenter was ready to retire. He told his employer-contractor of his plans to leave the house building business and live a more leisurely life with his wife enjoying his extended family. He would miss the paycheck, but he needed to retire. They could get by.

The contractor was sorry to see his good worker go and asked if he could build just one more house as a personal favor. The carpenter said yes, but in time it was easy to see that his heart was not in his work. He resorted to shoddy workmanship and used inferior materials. It was an unfortunate way to end his career.

When the carpenter finished his work and the builder came to inspect the house, the contractor handed the front-door key to the carpenter. “This is your house,” he said, “my gift to you.”

What a shock! What a shame! If he had only known he was building his own house, he would have done it all so differently. Now he had to live in the home he had built none too well.

So it is with us. We build our lives in a distracted way, reacting rather than acting, willing to put up less than the best. At important points we may not give the job our best effort.

Then with a shock we look at the situation we have created and find that we are now living in the house we have built. If we had realized, we would have done it differently. Think of yourself as the carpenter. Think about your house. Each day you hammer a nail, place a board, or erect a wall. Build wisely. It is the only life you will ever build. Even if you live it for only one day more, that day deserves to be lived graciously and with dignity. The plaque on the wall says, “Life is a do-it-yourself project.” Who could say it more clearly? Your life today is the result of your attitudes and choices in the past. Your life tomorrow will be the result of your attitudes and the choices you make today.


Prakash Iyer, MD, Kimberly-Clark Lever and Executive Coach shares two important management lessons he learnt from a 500-rupee note. Read on.

1. It happened some years ago but I can recall the evening like it happened just last week.
I was in an audience listening to a motivational guru.
The speaker whipped out his wallet and pulled out a five hundred-rupee note.
Holding it up, he asked, “Who wants this five hundred rupee note?”
Lots of hands went up. Including mine.
A slow chorus began to build as people began to shout “Me!” “Me!”
I began to wonder who the lucky one would be who the speaker would choose.
And I also secretly wondered — and I am sure others did too — why he would simply give away five hundred rupees.
Even as the shouts of “I want it” grew louder, I noticed a young woman running down the aisle.
She ran up onto the stage, went up to the speaker, and grabbed the five hundred-rupee note from his hand. “Well done, young lady,” said the speaker into the microphone.
“Most of us just wait for good things to happen. That’s of no use. You’ve got to make things happen.”
The speaker’s words have stayed with me ever since.

‘Simply thinking about doing something is of no use’

Our lives are like that. We all see opportunities around us. We all want the good things.
But the problem is we don’t take action.
We all want the five hundred rupee notes on offer. But we don’t make the move. We look at it longingly.Get up, and do something about it. Don’t worry about what other people might think. Take action.

2. Several years later, it was another day, another time.
And another motivational guru.
As I watched him pull out a five hundred rupee note and hold it up for all to see, I thought I knew what he was going to do next. But he just asked a simple question. “How much is this worth?”
“Five Hundred rupees!” the crowd yelled in unison.
“Right,” said the speaker. He then took the note and crumpled it into a ball and asked “How much is it worth now?”
“Five Hundred rupees!” screamed the audience.
He then threw the note on the ground, stamped all over it and picked up the note and asked one more time: “And how much is it worth now?”
“Five Hundred rupees!” was the response.
“I want you to remember this,” said the speaker.
“Just because someone crumples it, or stamps on it, the value of the note does not diminish.
We should all be like the five hundred rupee note..
In our lives, there will be times when we feel crushed, stamped over, beaten. But never let your self-worth diminish. Just because someone chooses to crush you — that doesn’t change your worth one bit!
Don’t allow your self-worth to diminish because someone says something nasty — or does something dirty — to you.”

‘Never let your self-worth diminish’

 

A Beautiful Picture

Posted: July 2, 2013 in Awesome 2 Read

There was a King who had 1 Eye and 1 leg..

He asked all the painters to draw a beautiful portrait of him. But none of them could — how could they paint him beautifully with the defects in one eye and one leg.

Eventually one of them agreed and drew a classic picture of the King.

It was a fantastic picture and surprised everyone..

He painted the King AIMING for a HUNT. Targeting with ONE Eye Closed and One Leg Bent …

Why cant we all paint pictures like this for others. Hiding their weaknesses and highlighting their strength…

Also think about it , often when we see a masterpiece we marvel at the skills of the painter and not of the objects (s)he painted,so next time you paint focus on the strengths , thats the way to create a masterpiece.


‘ David had bought his Dad a sweater from an online store. The sweater arrived the day before Christmas Eve and was the wrong size. His family actually celebrated Christmas and swapped presents on Christmas Eve. David was in a jam.

David decided that he would call the company he had bought the sweater from, knowing that it was too late to get another sweater. He was hoping just to get to talk to someone without holding forever and to place his order to get his Dad’s sweater as soon as possible after Christmas.

He called the company … L.L.Bean.

“Merry Christmas,” answered the customer rep on the first ring. “How can I help you?”

David told the story, asking how to exchange the sweater and how to get a new one sent out after Christmas for his Dad.

“After Christmas?” was the reply. “You simply package the sweater up and send it back when you can. In the meantime, I’ll get another one out tonight via FedEx for your Father to have tomorrow.”

No questions, no problem. Simply Let’s take care of your problem—courtesy the L.L.Bean way.’

BTW , LL Bean is a famous clothing store known for its exceptional customer service .

Besides the ‘WOW’ factor , I was also blown away with the level of transactional freedom , authority and entitlements entrusted to a simple call handler.

Image  —  Posted: June 28, 2013 in Customer Service Stories
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I wear dress shirts to work every day, so for Christmas, my wife ordered three new shirts from LL Bean. Like all my other shirts, she ordered them with my initials monogrammed on the pocket. Some of my old shirts are a little threadbare, so I was thrilled to have new shirts. (Kids, when you get older, clothing CAN be an exciting Christmas gift.) The Monday after Christmas, I pull one out of the closet to wear to work. The sleeves are too short—way too short.

I didn’t try them on Christmas day because almost all of my shirts come from LL Bean. They’re all the same size. I just took them from the package, washed them and hung them with my other shirts.

Turns out, my wife had confused my inseam length with my sleeve length and ordered shirts with the sleeves three inches too short. I was quite disappointed, but my wife was fuming mad at herself. That’s about $150 worth of shirts that had my initials on them and I couldn’t wear. We, naturally, assumed we would be stuck with the shirts. It was her error, not LL Bean’s. We’d just be careful ordering in the future—”Measure twice, order once,” to steal a carpenter’s axiom.

I encouraged my wife to call anyway, just in case, and explain what had happened. Reluctant to admit a mistake, she waited to call until yesterday. She wasn’t calling to try to return them, just to place an order for replacement shirts.

The conversation with the LL Bean customer service agent went something like this (paraphrasing):

Wife: “I placed order xxxxxxx in November, and I’d like to re-place that exact order with different size shirts.”
LL Bean: “That’s an odd request, why do you need to do that?”
Wife: “I ordered the shirts for my husband, and the sleeves are 3 inches too short, but it was my mistake, and they are monogrammed, so I know I can’t return them.”
LL Bean: “Oh, you need to send those back to us. We’ll replace them for you.”
Wife: “But it was my mistake. I don’t want you to have to pay for my mistake. Can I just place a new order?”
LL Bean: “I’m sorry, ma’am, I can’t place your new order for those shirts, you’ll have to send them back so we can replace them for you.”
Wife: “They’re monogrammed though, you won’t be able to re-sell them.”
LL Bean: “I understand that, but we always want to make sure our customers are 100% satisfied with their orders.”

This is truly an above and beyond from LL Bean. We ordered the wrong size monogrammed shirts, called them not to try to return them but to place a new order, and LL Bean refused the new sale and instead is sending us new shirts and eating $150 on the monogrammed shirts. Instead of $300 in sales, they have $150 in sales and three ruined shirts.

I wear dress shirts to work every day, so for Christmas, my wife ordered three new shirts from LL Bean. Like all my other shirts, she ordered them with my initials monogrammed on the pocket. Some of my old shirts are a little threadbare, so I was thrilled to have new shirts. (Kids, when you get older, clothing CAN be an exciting Christmas gift.) The Monday after Christmas, I pull one out of the closet to wear to work. The sleeves are too short—way too short.

I didn’t try them on Christmas day because almost all of my shirts come from LL Bean. They’re all the same size. I just took them from the package, washed them and hung them with my other shirts.

Turns out, my wife had confused my inseam length with my sleeve length and ordered shirts with the sleeves three inches too short. I was quite disappointed, but my wife was fuming mad at herself. That’s about $150 worth of shirts that had my initials on them and I couldn’t wear. We, naturally, assumed we would be stuck with the shirts. It was her error, not LL Bean’s. We’d just be careful ordering in the future—”Measure twice, order once,” to steal a carpenter’s axiom.

I encouraged my wife to call anyway, just in case, and explain what had happened. Reluctant to admit a mistake, she waited to call until yesterday. She wasn’t calling to try to return them, just to place an order for replacement shirts.

The conversation with the LL Bean customer service agent went something like this (paraphrasing):

Wife: “I placed order xxxxxxx in November, and I’d like to re-place that exact order with different size shirts.”
LL Bean: “That’s an odd request, why do you need to do that?”
Wife: “I ordered the shirts for my husband, and the sleeves are 3 inches too short, but it was my mistake, and they are monogrammed, so I know I can’t return them.”
LL Bean: “Oh, you need to send those back to us. We’ll replace them for you.”
Wife: “But it was my mistake. I don’t want you to have to pay for my mistake. Can I just place a new order?”
LL Bean: “I’m sorry, ma’am, I can’t place your new order for those shirts, you’ll have to send them back so we can replace them for you.”
Wife: “They’re monogrammed though, you won’t be able to re-sell them.”
LL Bean: “I understand that, but we always want to make sure our customers are 100% satisfied with their orders.”

This is truly an above and beyond from LL Bean. We ordered the wrong size monogrammed shirts, called them not to try to return them but to place a new order, and LL Bean refused the new sale and instead is sending us new shirts and eating $150 on the monogrammed shirts. Instead of $300 in sales, they have $150 in sales and three ruined shirts.

A Blind Boy!!!

Posted: June 21, 2013 in Awesome 2 Read, Day 2 Day

A blind boy sat on the steps of a building with a hat by his feet. He held up a sign which said: “I am blind, please help.”

There were only a few coins in the hat.

A man was walking by. He took a few coins from his pocket and dropped them into the hat. He then took the sign, turned it around, and wrote some words. He put the sign back so that everyone who walked by would see the new words.

Soon the hat began to fill up. A lot more people were giving money to the blind boy. That afternoon the man who had changed the sign came to see how things were.

The boy recognized his footsteps and asked, “Were you the one who changed my sign this morning? What did you write?”

The man said, “I only wrote the truth. I said what you said but in a different way.”

What he had written was: “Today is a beautiful day and I cannot see it.”

Do you think the first sign and the second sign were saying the same thing?

Of course both signs told people the boy was blind. But the first sign simply said the boy was blind. The second sign told people they were so lucky that they were not blind. Should we be surprised that the second sign was more effective?

Moral of the story: Be thankful for what you have. Be creative. Be innovative. Think differently and positively.

Invite others towards good with wisdom. Live life with no excuse and love with no regrets. When life gives you a 100 reasons to cry, show life that you have 1000 reasons to smile. Face your past without regret. Handle your present with confidence. Prepare for the future without fear. Keep the faith and drop the fear.

Great men say, “Life has to be an incessant process of repair and reconstruction, of discarding evil and developing goodness…. In the journey of life, if you want to travel without fear, you must have the ticket of a good conscience.”

The most beautiful thing is to see a person smiling… And even more beautiful is, knowing that you are the reason behind it!!!


“There is no formula, experience is unique to each individual and his aspiration. Basically, he must be willing to find the zone of his calling”

The Japanese have a great liking for fresh fish. But the waters close to Japan have not held many fish for decades. So, to feed the Japanese population, fishing boats got bigger and went farther than ever.

The farther the fishermen went, the longer it took to bring back the fish. The longer it took them to bring back the fish, the stale they grew.

The fish were not fresh and the Japanese did not like the taste. To solve this problem, fishing companies installed freezers on their boats. They would catch the fish and freeze them at sea. Freezers allowed the boats to go farther and stay longer. However, the Japanese could taste the difference between fresh and frozen fish. And they did not like the taste of frozen fish. The frozen fish brought a lower price. So, fishing companies installed fish tanks. They would catch the fish and stuff them in the tanks, fin to fin. After a little hashing around, the fish stopped moving. They were tired and dull, but alive.

Unfortunately, the Japanese could still taste the difference. Because the fish did not move for days, they lost their fresh-fish taste. The Japanese preferred the lively taste of fresh fish, not sluggish fish. The fishing industry faced an impending crisis! But today, it has got over that crisis and has emerged as one of the most important trades in that country! How did Japanese fishing companies solve this problem? How do they get fresh-tasting fish to Japan ?

To keep the fish tasting fresh, the Japanese fishing companies still put the fish in the tanks. But now they add a small shark to each tank. The shark eats a few fish, but most of the fish arrive in a very lively state. The fish are challenged and hence are constantly on the move. And they survive and arrive in a healthy state!They command a higher price and are most sought-after. The challenge they face keeps them fresh!

Source::Story from book which can be found in several sites like This 

 

Humans are no different. L. Ron Hubbard observed in the early 1950’s: “Man thrives, oddly enough, only in the presence of a challenging environment.” George Bernard Shaw said: ” Satisfaction is death!”

The more intelligent, persistent and competent you are, the more you enjoy a challenge.If you are steadily conquering challenges, you are happy. Your challenges keep you energized. You are excited to try new solutions. You have fun. You are alive! Instead of avoiding challenges, jump into them. Do not postpone a task, simply because its challenging. Catch these challenges by their horns and vanquish them. If your challenges are too large or too numerous, do not give up. Giving up makes you tired. Instead, reorganize. Find more determination, more knowledge, more help. You have the resources, skills and abilities to make a difference.

Put a shark in your tank and see how far you can really go!

Though there are critics who have found several fault(s) with the book but I feel it is worth reading.Honest and straight from heart